Multi Threaded Programming in Java

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Multi Threaded Programming in Java

As computer systems continue to evolve and become more complex, the need for concurrent programming has become increasingly important. Concurrent programming allows multiple threads of execution to run simultaneously, allowing for much more efficient and faster processing of data. Java has been designed to support concurrent programming, and this guide will explore the various aspects of multi threaded programming in Java.

I. Introduction

What is multi threading?

Multi threading is a technique that allows a program to perform several tasks simultaneously. It is the ability of the operating system to manage multiple threads of execution, where each thread can execute a separate part of the program. By running multiple threads at the same time, the program can achieve better performance and responsiveness.

Why is multi threading important in Java?

Java is a popular programming language used for developing applications that run on various platforms. It is designed to support multi threading, which makes it possible to create applications that can perform multiple tasks simultaneously. Multi threading is particularly important in Java because it allows developers to write more efficient and responsive applications.

Overview of Java’s threading model

Java’s threading model is based on the concept of threads. A thread is a lightweight process that can perform a specific task or a set of tasks. Each thread has its own call stack and can access shared data. Java’s threading model allows developers to create and manage threads easily, and provides synchronization mechanisms to ensure thread safety.

II. Creating and Managing Threads

Creating a thread with Thread class

The simplest way to create a thread in Java is to extend the Thread class and override its run() method. The run() method contains the code that will be executed when the thread is started.

class MyThread extends Thread {
  public void run() {
    // code to be executed
  }
}
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To start the thread, you create an instance of the class and call its start() method.

MyThread thread = new MyThread();
thread.start();
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Creating a thread with Runnable interface

Another way to create a thread in Java is to implement the Runnable interface and pass an instance of the class to the Thread constructor.

class MyRunnable implements Runnable {
  public void run() {
    // code to be executed
  }
}
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MyRunnable runnable = new MyRunnable();
Thread thread = new Thread(runnable);
thread.start();
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Using the Runnable interface is preferred over extending the Thread class because it allows you to separate the thread’s behavior from its execution.

Starting and stopping threads

To start a thread, you call its start() method. The start() method is responsible for creating a new thread and invoking the run() method.

Thread thread = new Thread(new MyRunnable());
thread.start();
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To stop a thread, you can call its interrupt() method. This will set the thread’s interrupt flag, which can be checked by calling the isInterrupted() method.

thread.interrupt();
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Thread priorities and scheduling

Java provides a way to set the priority of a thread using the setPriority() method. The priority can be set to a value between 1 and 10, where 1 is the lowest priority and 10 is the highest.

Thread thread = new Thread(new MyRunnable());
thread.setPriority(Thread.MAX_PRIORITY);
thread.start();
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Java’s thread scheduler is responsible for determining the order in which threads are executed. The scheduler uses a priority-based algorithm to determine which thread should be executed next.

Daemon threads

A daemon thread is a thread that runs in the background and provides a service to other threads. A daemon thread will not prevent the program from exiting if all other non-daemon threads have completed.

To create a daemon thread, you can call the setDaemon() method and pass it true.

Thread thread = new Thread(new MyRunnable());
thread.setDaemon(true);
thread.start();
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III. Synchronization and Locking

Synchronized methods and blocks

Java provides a way to synchronize access to shared resources using the synchronized keyword. When a method or block is marked as synchronized, only one thread can execute it at a time.

public synchronized void increment() {
  count++;
}
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public void increment() {
  synchronized(this) {
    count++;
  }
}
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Locks and conditions

Java’s Lock interface provides a more flexible way to synchronize access to shared resources. Locks allow you to specify the order in which threads acquire and release a lock on a shared resource.

Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
lock.lock();

try {
  // code to be executed
} finally {
  lock.unlock();
}
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Java’s Condition interface can be used in conjunction with locks to provide more fine-grained control over thread synchronization. Conditions allow threads to wait for specific conditions to be met before proceeding.

Lock lock = new ReentrantLock();
Condition condition = lock.newCondition();

lock.lock();

try {
  while (conditionIsNotMet) {
    condition.await();
  }

  // code to be executed
} finally {
  lock.unlock();
}
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Deadlocks and how to avoid them

Deadlocks occur when two or more threads are waiting for each other to release a lock or resource, resulting in a deadlock. Deadlocks can be difficult to debug and fix, so it’s important to avoid them in the first place.

One way to avoid deadlocks is to always acquire locks in a consistent order. Another way is to use timeouts when acquiring locks or waiting for conditions to be met.

Atomic variables

Java provides a set of classes in the java.util.concurrent.atomic package that provide atomic operations on variables. Atomic variables are thread-safe and can be used to avoid race conditions and data races.

AtomicInteger count = new AtomicInteger(0);
count.incrementAndGet();
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IV. Thread Safety and Concurrency Control

Race conditions and data race

Race conditions occur when the outcome of a program depends on the order in which threads execute. Data races occur when two or more threads access the same memory location concurrently and at least one of the accesses is a write.

To avoid race conditions and data races, it’s important to synchronize access to shared resources using locks or synchronized methods/blocks.

Immutability and its benefits

Immutable objects are objects whose state cannot be changed once they are created. Immutable objects are inherently thread-safe and can be shared across threads without the need for synchronization.

public final class MyImmutableClass {
  private final int value;

  public MyImmutableClass(int value) {
    this.value = value;
  }

  public int getValue() {
    return value;
  }
}
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Thread-local variables

Thread-local variables are variables that are local to a specific thread and are not shared with other threads. Thread-local variables can be used to avoid synchronization and improve performance.

ThreadLocal<Integer> threadLocal = new ThreadLocal<Integer>() {
  @Override
  protected Integer initialValue() {
    return 0;
  }
};

public void increment() {
  int value = threadLocal.get();
  threadLocal.set(value + 1);
}
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Thread-safe collections

Java provides a set of thread-safe collections in the java.util.concurrent package. These collections are designed to be used in multi threaded environments and provide thread-safe access to shared data structures.

List<String> list = new CopyOnWriteArrayList<>();
list.add("hello");
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V. Parallelism and Performance

Parallelism vs Concurrency

Parallelism and concurrency are often used interchangeably, but they are not the same thing. Concurrency refers to the ability of a program to handle multiple tasks concurrently, while parallelism refers to the ability of a program to execute multiple tasks simultaneously.

Fork/Join Framework

The Fork/Join framework is a Java library for parallel programming that is designed to take advantage of multi-core processors. The framework is based on the divide-and-conquer paradigm and is particularly well-suited for recursive algorithms.

class MyRecursiveTask extends RecursiveTask<Integer> {
  @Override
  protected Integer compute() {
    // divide task into subtasks
    // invoke subtasks in parallel
    // combine results
    return result;
  }
}
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Executor Framework

The Executor framework is a Java library for managing a pool of threads. The framework provides a set of interfaces and classes for executing tasks asynchronously and managing thread pools.

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
executor.submit(new MyRunnable());
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Thread Pooling

Thread pooling is a technique for managing a pool of threads that can be used to execute tasks asynchronously. Thread pooling can improve performance by reducing the overhead of creating and destroying threads.

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
  executor.submit(new MyRunnable());
}
executor.shutdown();
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VI. Advanced Topics

Interrupts and interruption policies

Interrupts are a mechanism for stopping a thread that is currently executing. Interrupts can be used to gracefully stop a thread or to abort a long-running task.

thread.interrupt();
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Java provides a set of interruption policies that determine how an interrupted thread should behave.

Thread groups

Thread groups are a way of organizing threads into a hierarchical structure. Thread groups can be used to manage and monitor a set of related threads.

ThreadGroup group = new ThreadGroup("MyThreadGroup");
Thread thread = new Thread(group, new MyRunnable());
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Java Memory Model and its implications

The Java Memory Model specifies how threads interact with memory in a multi threaded environment. Understanding the Java Memory Model is important for writing correct and efficient multi threaded applications.

Java 8’s CompletableFuture and CompletionService

Java 8 introduced the CompletableFuture class as a way to perform asynchronous computations and handle their results. CompletableFuture provides a wide range of methods for composing and chaining computations in a non-blocking way.

CompletableFuture<String> future = CompletableFuture.supplyAsync(() -> {
  // long-running task
  return "result";
});
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Java’s CompletionService interface provides a way to manage a set of asynchronous computations and retrieve their results as they become available.

ExecutorService executor = Executors.newFixedThreadPool(10);
CompletionService<String> completionService = new ExecutorCompletionService<>(executor);

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
  completionService.submit(new MyCallable());
}

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) {
  Future<String> future = completionService.take();
  String result = future.get();
}
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VII. Best Practices and Pitfalls

Common pitfalls and how to avoid them

Multi threaded programming is inherently complex and can be prone to a variety of bugs and issues. Some common pitfalls include race conditions, deadlock, and livelock.

To avoid these issues, it is important to follow best practices such as using synchronization, avoiding shared mutable state, and writing testable code.

Best practices for multi threaded programming

Some best practices for multi threaded programming include:

  • Avoid shared mutable state as much as possible
  • Use synchronization and locking to protect shared resources
  • Use thread-safe collections when possible
  • Avoid relying on thread priorities for correctness
  • Write testable code and test it thoroughly

Testing and debugging multi threaded applications

Testing and debugging multi threaded applications can be challenging. Some tips for testing and debugging include:

  • Use a tool like ThreadLocal to isolate test cases
  • Use a debugger to step through code and inspect thread state
  • Use a profiler to identify performance bottlenecks

Performance tuning

Performance tuning multi threaded applications can be complex. Some tips for performance tuning include:

  • Use thread pooling to reduce the overhead of creating and destroying threads
  • Use non-blocking algorithms and data structures when possible
  • Use caching to reduce the frequency of expensive operations
  • Use profiling tools to identify performance bottlenecks

VIII. Conclusion

In conclusion, multi threaded programming is an important skill for Java developers. By understanding the threading model, creating and managing threads, synchronizing access to shared resources, and using advanced features like CompletableFuture, developers can write efficient and scalable multi threaded applications.

By following best practices and avoiding common pitfalls, developers can avoid bugs and issues and write robust and maintainable code.

xalgord
WRITTEN BY

xalgord

Constantly learning & adapting to new technologies. Passionate about solving complex problems with code. #programming #softwareengineering

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